Amazing! Audi has 3D printed a 1:2 scale of the famed Auto Union Type C Car.

http://3dprintingindustry.com/?p=61555

Moving the 1911 FIAT S76 from a London street to the lobby of the Royal Automobile Club proves to be no easy feat.

Shining like a jewel in Gringotts Wizarding Bank, this Goodwood article about maneuvering the 1911 FIAT S76 into London's Royal Automobile Club stood out amidst today's news surrounding the many automotive engineering feats debuting at the 2015 Tokyo Motor Show.

https://grrc.goodwood.com/?p=61202

I'm not sure how much the chain-driven "Beast of Turin" weighs, but one look at the behemoth leads me to believe it must be around two tons. Imagine pondering how to move a car of that size and weight through the revolving doors of a private club on London's Pall Mall and up one floor. Although I've supervised teams transporting rare automobiles to numerous photo locations, I've never encountered a problem quite like this. Best read the story in case you two are faced with a similar Laurel and Hardy problem.

I'm sharing this insightful Popular Science post to inspire reflection upon a robotic era in transportation. If you were forced to make a middle-of-the-night trip to the hospital with a sick child in your arms, would you prefer being driven by a robotic car or a human in a taxi cab?

http://www.popsci.com/uber-powerful

Car Culture is delighted to announce the arrival of a very special collectable:

The Dashboard: Volume 1 Portfolio Edition

Limited to 25 sets including a print and custom boxed book
Signed by Lucinda Lewis and Tom Matano
The Dashboard doesn’t resemble any book I’ve ever made before. It’s hand-made, with quality like some of the coachbuilt cars portrayed on its pages and also sold as prints on www.carculture.com. Featured on the cover is the 1927 Delage Type: 1.5 Liter Grand Prix Car--Louis Delage's masterwork. 
Strictly limited to just 25 sets, these original books are signed by photographer Lucinda Lewis and Automotive Designer Tom Matano and presented in a hand-made archival clam shell box.
 
Famed automotive designer, Tom Matano, has provided insightful comments on each dashboard featured with the book. Automobiles portrayed and discussed range from the 1901 Panhard et Levassor 10hp Cab to the 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid. Matano's comments are enlightening and instructional to the automotive aficionado and add a new dimension to Lucinda Lewis’s photographs featured within the book.
 
The Dashboard is designed and printed by Artisan Books in England on Library of Congress certified archival paper, embossed and bound by hand. The resulting collectable edition is a piece of craftsmanship and has been nominated for a major publishing award.
 
Definitely Better than a Box of Chocolates.
 
In addition to the book, each Solander box contains a large 11 x 14 inch giclée print of the 1937 Cord Model 812 Berline Limousine from the book. The prints of course, are also signed and numbered in pencil by Lucinda Lewis. Remember, there will only be 25 prints in this edition of the 1937 Cord Model 812 Berline Limousine Dashboard.
Prices increase as the edition number becomes higher. Buy Early.
Size 14 x 16.5"
First Come - First Serve. Free Shipping

 

In Discovery News, We found a fascinating alternative to a driverless car future here



A philosopher is perhaps the last person you’d expect to have a hand in designing your next car, but that’s exactly what one expert on self-driving vehicles has in mind.

Chris Gerdes, a professor at Stanford University, leads a research lab that is experimenting with sophisticated hardware and software for automated driving. But together with Patrick Lin, a professor of philosophy at Cal Poly, he is also exploring the ethical dilemmas that may arise when vehicle self-driving is deployed in the real world.

Gerdes and Lin organized a workshop at Stanford earlier this year that brought together philosophers and engineers to discuss the issue. They implemented different ethical settings in the software that controls automated vehicles and then tested the code in simulations and even in real vehicles. Such settings might, for example, tell a car to prioritize avoiding humans over avoiding parked vehicles, or not to swerve for squirrels.

Fully self-driving vehicles are still at the research stage, but automated driving technology is rapidly creeping into vehicles. Over the next couple of years, a number of carmakers plan to release vehicles capable of steering, accelerating, and braking for themselves on highways for extended periods. Some cars already feature sensors that can detect pedestrians or cyclists, and warn drivers if it seems they might hit someone.

So far, self-driving cars have been involved in very few accidents. Google’s automated cars have covered nearly a million miles of road with just a few rear-enders, and these vehicles typically deal with uncertain situations by simply stopping (see “Google’s Self-Driving Car Chief Defends Safety Record”).

As the technology advances, however, and cars become capable of interpreting more complex scenes, automated driving systems may need to make split-second decisions that raise real ethical questions.

At a recent industry event, Gerdes gave an example of one such scenario: a child suddenly dashing into the road, forcing the self-driving car to choose between hitting the child or swerving into an oncoming van.

“As we see this with human eyes, one of these obstacles has a lot more value than the other,” Gerdes said. “What is the car’s responsibility?”

Gerdes pointed out that it might even be ethically preferable to put the passengers of the self-driving car at risk. “If that would avoid the child, if it would save the child’s life, could we injure the occupant of the vehicle? These are very tough decisions that those that design control algorithms for automated vehicles face every day,” he said.

Gerdes called on researchers, automotive engineers, and automotive executives at the event to prepare to consider the ethical implications of the technology they are developing. “You’re not going to just go and get the ethics module, and plug it into your self-driving car,” he said.

Other experts agree that there will be an important ethical dimension to the development of automated driving technology.

Alessandrini leads a project called CityMobil2, which is testing automated transit vehicles in various Italian cities. These vehicles are far simpler than the cars being developed by Google and many carmakers; they simply follow a route and brake if something gets in the way. Alessandrini believes this may make the technology easier to launch. “We don’t have this [ethical] problem,” he says.

Others believe the situation is a little more complicated. For example, Bryant Walker-Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina who studies the legal and social implications of self-driving vehicles, says plenty of ethical decisions are already made in automotive engineering. “Ethics, philosophy, law: all of these assumptions underpin so many decisions,” he says. “If you look at airbags, for example, inherent in that technology is the assumption that you’re going to save a lot of lives, and only kill a few.”

Walker-Smith adds that, given the number of fatal traffic accidents that involve human error today, it could be considered unethical to introduce self-driving technology too slowly. “The biggest ethical question is how quickly we move. We have a technology that potentially could save a lot of people, but is going to be imperfect and is going to kill.”

 

This is Car Culture's idea of fireworks—John Lennon's psychedelic 1965 Rolls-Royce Phantom V. Although Lennon could well-afford the car by 1965, he wasn't happy playing the part of a classic wealthy British gentleman being squired about town in a black Rolls-Royce.

 

Legend has it that Lennon was a poor driver, so the idea of a chauffeur didn't really bother him. Since he was happy to reside in the back of the long-bodied limousine, he ripped out the back seat and had a double bed installed so he could loll about barefoot while listening to his state-of-the-art sound system, perhaps “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”?

 

Ring Starr suggested that Lennon repaint the staid black vehicle, an idea that Lennon enthusiastically adopted. Lennon hired a group of Dutch painters known as The Fool who repainted the Rolls-Royce to resemble a gypsy caravan.

 

Where is this car now? Anyone know?